Sunday, December 10, 2017

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR photo for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).


Macie

Foster Squeek

Foster Barrett Bear

Fergie

Foster Chaco

Foster Steve

Tai fna CP Taiwan

Charlie and CP Nellie Mae

Foster Nash

Foster Melly

Foster Giancarlo

Rodney


Saturday, December 9, 2017

Not Too Late to get Great Christmas Decorations!

Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

Lynch Creek Farm is pleased to partner with Col. Potter again to bring you a special Fundraiser Campaign Col.Potter Cairn Rescue Network Giving Green!  Now through Sunday, December 10th, you can order any beautiful, high quality wreath, centerpiece, or other decorative item for the Holidays, as a Gift, or for your own home, and Lynch Creek Farm will donate a full 20% of your purchase to Col. Potter to help save another Cairn in need!  You can order now for December delivery, easy as 1.2.3!  Not ready to shop?  You can make a straight-up donation via the Lynch Creek Farm campaign and 100% of all donations will go to the Cairns!  100%!!!  A fantastic opportunity to donate or to give a gift that gives twice!

Lynch Creek Farm Presents
Now - December 10th
20% of all proceeds and 100% of all donations
during this time will be sent to

Check out some of our Sunday Sweets Favorites, featuring many Rescued Cairns and friends who have been helped by the generosity and hard work of so many Col. Potter Volunteers - the best gift in any season!



Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

 

 

Friday, December 8, 2017

Friday Flashback: Charlie Catches Spring Fever!

Written by Charlie aka Chuckles fka CP Sir. Charlie
Originally posted 6/6/2014 on the Post Adoption Blog

Charlie fka CP Sir. Charlie - still Happy in Forever!

Hey, Col. Potter people!   It’s finally Spring! 

You might remember me from a few months back (eight, if you want to be precise…) as that charming older gentleman, Sir. Charlie, adopted by another charming older gentleman, my Dad!  He dropped the “Sir.” As it was just too formal for us country folk, so now I am simply Charlie – but I am still Charming!
Do you like this profile better?
A nice lady named “Janet” came over and took some photos of me – and fell in love with me, of course!  (I am charming, after all…)

I like to take my Dad for a walk…

…and Dad likes to check out the other animals!

Anyway, my Dad calls me “Chuckles” because I make him laugh every day, and that’s a good thing too.  He, in turn, takes me for nice walks every day, and I let him stop and check out the pesky alpaca (who is just a stick in the mud as far as I’m concerned), and he likes to stop and make sure the cattle are keeping the grass short enough (especially with the ticks!).
I love the Spring!
 
Dad calls me “Chuckles” because I make him laugh!
I then always treat him to my "stop, drop, and roll" routine which makes him laugh.  I like to keep him happy!  Happy Dad!  Happy Charlie!  Simple as that!

Well, that’s it for now, but I’ll let you know how things are going down the road.  Now…  Where did we leave that pesky alpaca?











Friday Funnies!

Off the Leash
Note: Click on the image to enlarge!



Thursday, December 7, 2017

Col. Potter Training Tips: Understanding and Managing Resource Guarding!

Resource Guarding is a natural instinct, brought on by anxiety, especially in a dog who is under-confident about other things in his life.  The very best course of action is to avoid situations that threaten the dog and its possessions.  Allow your dog to chew in peace when appropriate and never try and take the toy away except as part of a positive exchange.

Resource Guarding

What is resource guarding?

Resource guarding (RG) is when a dog has possession of an object that he/she thinks is valuable, and is growling/snapping/biting in an effort to protect/keep that object.  

The object may be something we deem silly, for example, a piece of Kleenex is a common object dogs guard...or even empty bowls.  Some dogs will even guard spots, like a bed or couch.  And in few, rarer cases dogs will see their owner is a resource and guard that person.
 
Why does my dog do this?

Generally speaking, RG is a genetic, inborn behavior.  This behavior evolved because in the wild, possession of something is important, and not allowing that thing to be stolen is a matter of life and death.  Many dogs retain this behavior, despite there being ample resources.  Just like hunting, playing, and mating, RG is a survival skill built into the dog.

In some cases, RG can be learned.  This happens most often when a bored dog starts to chew objects.  The owner approaches and removes the object, often times scolding the dog.  Unfortunately, this only teaches the dog to steal/chew objects out of the owner’s sight to avoid punishment, and/OR it will teach him that he needs to protect the object from the owner, as he sees the owner as a thief.
 
Things like anxiety, being in a new home, or the addition of another dog or pet can increase these behaviors, or cause them to appear seemingly spontaneously.  Dogs that are under-confident in other aspects of their lives tend to be guarders.


This puppy is at the first level of warning, freezing in place and giving a hard stare, his paw on his toy, because his Alpha sister is standing right there, ready to jump in and grab his special toy.  Know the signs so you can avoid trouble!  The timely distraction of a training session, with “sits” and “downs” and great treats, avoided further escalation in this case.

What’s with all the biting, snapping, growling?

These behaviors are part of the dogs hierarchy of warnings.  The warnings play out like this:

  • Freezing in place/hard staring
  • Placing face against the object, putting more paws on the object
  • Lip lifting
  • Growling
  • Warning/air snapping (these will not make contact)
  • Warning snaps with contact (does not break skin)
  • Biting that breaks skin
  • Full attack fight that must be broken up.

Generally speaking, most dogs will travel up the hierarchy, over time, giving stronger and stronger warnings, until they finally end up biting or attacking.  Now, how hard the dog bites, depends on his learned bite inhibition.  Bite inhibition is learned as a puppy from littermates, and from his owners when he comes home.  If a dog has good bite inhibition, he will be very restrained in his bites, if he has poor control, he may bite very hard, and sooner than a dog with better control.

Some dogs go up this hierarchy, gradually, over time.  For example a dog being pestered by another dog while he eats may progress over weeks or months until they finally fight, but other dogs may go up the warning hierarchy VERY quickly - so quickly that they run through all the signals in a blink of an eye.  These are the types of dogs that many people site as “biting without warning".  What actually is happening is perhaps the owner did not see the signals, or chose to ignore or punish the lower level signals.

The point being, dogs do not want to attack over their object, they want to do everything possible to keep their object, but without causing harm, this is ritualized aggression.  Its when the issue is pushed (for example a human that continues to take objects away despite warnings, or another dog that continues to bully the RG) the dog's behavior can, and usually does, escalate.
 
Should I use corrections to stop this?
Isn't my dog trying to dominant me?

Dogs that RG are not trying to climb a social ladder, or overthrow the humans as the "leader".  In fact, these are the dogs in the household with confidence or anxiety issues. These are dogs that are, in a sense, "paranoid" that everyone is out to get their "valued thing".  Confident dogs do not feel the need to RG most objects, as they are positive no one is even going to try to take their stuff.
 
However, most "normal" dogs, with average to high confidence, may guard something of very high value - like a piece of raw meat, a new toy, etc. - when the dog doesn't normally get to have those things.  It is the abnormally high value of the object that elicits the behavior.
 
Strangers can also create the behavior.  A dog that would never RG from the family may snap at a guest, the anxiety from not knowing the person as well triggers the behavior.  Or, in the case of a party or gathering at the house, the dog may simply be over-stimulated.

Corrections for this behavior, such as yelling at the dog, making hissing sounds, physically punishing the dog, poking him, or removing the object as punishment are all methods with a very high likelihood of backfiring, plus making the behavior worse.  Since this is often anxiety based, punishment will only increase anxiety, and also damage your relationship with your dog.  It puts you two in conflict every time he finds an object he likes.

What should I do first?

First, we want to manage (prevent) the behavior as much as possible.  Pick up your clothes and things, remove dog toys and treats from the floor, moving and covering trashcans, and so forth.  Use x-pens and baby gates to keep your dog out of areas where he is going to find objects to guard.
 
The reason this is so important is that every time the dog practices the behavior, it is becoming more and more ingrained.  Preventing it helps keep the dog at the level he/she is already at, while you implement training.  If the dog guards food/food bowls, feed him separately from other dogs, preferably in his own room or crate.
 
For dogs that guard food bowls/food management:
 
If the dog is being aggressive with humans, one of the best things you can start is hand-feeding ALL meals.  Many dogs do not make the connection that food comes from YOU, and instead think it magically appears in their magic bowl (hence guarding an empty bowl).
 
Couch/bed guarding management:

Attaching a short leash to help guide the dog off the spot will work in an emergency, but placing cardboard boxes or other objects on the surface that discourage usage is preferred.  Also remember to close doors or use baby gates to keep the dog away from the surface they guard.

Make sure to discuss the management plan with all family members so that everyone is on board and there is a better chance of success.

Ok, so I am preventing the behavior, can I start training now?

Yes, but first...

All this training advice is meant as a guideline.  Different dogs will progress at different rates due to temperament, history, environment, handler skill, and so forth.  It is very important to understand that RG takes a decent amount of time to "fix" with most dogs, and the training will have to be repeated, from the beginning, with all other family members to ensure the dog has generalized the behavior.  Patience is key.

Also, if your dog is breaking skin, you are otherwise afraid or intimidated by your dog, or you in any way feel you may be harmed (dog size is a factor to consider), then its time to hire a professional to help you.  Keep in mind, most trainers are not experienced in aggression cases and will not take them on.  Also be aware that many of the trainers that agree to take on aggression cases may not be truly qualified to do so.  Your best bet is to select your trainer very wisely or hire a good behaviorist, in either case, one who understands and practices Relationship Based Training.


Read About Relationship Based Training Tips from Suzanne Clothier:


Watch a Great Video about Relationship Based Training Tips by Zak George:




Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Wacky Wednesday!


Note: Click on the image to enlarge!
Wednesday is the day to be WACKY!  Each week we will showcase a terrierific Cairn picture with an appropriate caption.  If you would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com!  All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.

A big shout out to Norway for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week!


Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Tuesday Tails: Hershey and Misha!

Note: Click on the image to enlarge!
Tuesday is full of Tails!  Each week we will showcase the Tail of one of our Col. Potter Rescued Cairns, either Post Adoption or still looking for that Forever Home while in a wonderful CP Foster Home.  If you have a great CP Post Adoption story (and photos!) and would like us to consider them for an upcoming "Tuesday Tails" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).

Sunday, December 3, 2017

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR photo for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).

Foster Juniper

Foster Carlotta

Leo fka Coffee Bean

Macie and Cindel

Foster Nessie

Ava fna CP Sequins

Foster Jib

Foster Carousel

Elish

Maggie fka Angelica (on right) and her sister Peyton

Foster Seth

Foster Bonita

Gracie fna CP Kayna

Sydney


Saturday, December 2, 2017

Still Time to Shop Lynch Creek Farm!

Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

Lynch Creek Farm is pleased to partner with Col. Potter again to bring you a special Fundraiser Campaign Col.Potter Cairn Rescue Network Giving Green!  Now through Sunday, December 10th, you can order any beautiful, high quality wreath, centerpiece, or other decorative item for the Holidays, as a Gift, or for your own home, and Lynch Creek Farm will donate a full 20% of your purchase to Col. Potter to help save another Cairn in need!  You can order now for December delivery, easy as 1.2.3!  Not ready to shop?  You can make a straight-up donation via the Lynch Creek Farm campaign and 100% of all donations will go to the Cairns!  100%!!!  A fantastic opportunity to donate or to give a gift that gives twice!

Lynch Creek Farm Presents
Now - December 10th
20% of all proceeds and 100% of all donations
during this time will be sent to

Check out some of our Sunday Sweets Favorites, featuring many Rescued Cairns and friends who have been helped by the generosity and hard work of so many Col. Potter Volunteers - the best gift in any season!



Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

 

 

Friday, December 1, 2017

Friday Flashback: Kody Celebrates His 1st Gotcha Year!

Written by Kody fka CP IC
Originally posted 11/24/2014 on the Post Adoption Blog

Kody fka CP IC, enjoying his 1st Gotcha Year!!
Hi there, it's me again, Kody!  Remember me?  When I was rescued by Col. Potter my name was “IC” and I was just a cute little puppy!  Mom and Dad officially adopted me the first week of December last year, but Mom told me my first truly significant “Gotcha Day” was November 8th.  She and Dad say that’s my special day since they went and picked me up that day!  At first I was a CP Foster, but Mom and Dad knew right away that I was already home! 

I know at times I can be a handful for Mom and Dad, but they’re OK with that!  Mom says I am a chewer… Guilty!  There is lots of evidence from my younger days to remind her, but well… I am still a puppy!  I am a highly skilled toy destroyer too, so Mom finally gave up on trying to find something I can't destroy.  Hehehehehe!

Dad and I love to play with the Teaser Pole!

Mom and Dad are pretty good at adapting, I have to say, so that’s what we all did. Now I get to play with something called a “teaser pole” that I think Dad invented.  Attached to this pole is a neat squeaker toy – without stuffing - and since my toy is tethered by a line, I can't take off and hide somewhere while I destroy it.   At first I thought “What?” but Dad knows how to make it so much fun for me to chase after it - and I usually do catch it!  I don’t mind now that it’s attached!  It’s much more fun to play with Dad!

Mom and Dad get a good laugh out of me zooming too!  They can't believe that after playing so hard with my teaser pole I have the energy to zoom around like a mad man!  I fly around the yard like a bullet, zoom through my pet door, fly around the living room, and back outside for more zooming!  I even have energy to zoom around and go flying through my hula hoop - which I really Love to do!

Look!  I can Fly!!

With all this fun, you might find it hard to believe that Mom has rules for me!   Rules!  I have to “Sit/Wait” to get out of my crate, to have my meals put down, and to go through doorways.  I am only allowed in the recliner when Mom or Dad are already sitting in it, but even then I have to wait for permission to jump up.  I try hard to respond to the “Hush” command, but you know how that can go sometimes…  Oh!  Then there is the “Leave it” command, and the famous “Off” command.  Good thing I’m smart enough to learn all these rules!

Mom thinks I would be a great dancer – at least that’s what she says!  I like to walk on two legs - and I have very good balance if I say so myself!  I love to try to jump up for attention, but Mom and Dad tell me I only get scratches with “four on the floor”. 

I have heard Mom and Dad say that compared to how I was when I first came to live with them, I am much better.  Well, of course!  Geesh!  Like I said, I was a cute little puppy!  They have high hopes, though, and think that by the time I’m five or so - hopefully - I will be mature!  Ha!!   I’m not so sure about it…

Wasn’t I a Cute little Puppy?

So, what do you think about how much I have grown?  Look at all that hair!!!  Good thing Mom is a professional groomer!  I usually get bathed, brushed and combed out every week because Mom likes me fuzzy - like a powder puff.  I have lots more hair than a Cairn so Mom and Dad are sure I have some other DNA mixed in there, but my personality is all Cairn all day long, and I’m really thankful that I got a chance to be rescued by the great Volunteers at Col. Potter Cairn Rescue Network.

Thank you for helping me celebrate my First Gotcha Year with my Forever Mom and Dad!!!
Read my First Christmas Story:
Read my First Post Adoption post:
Read my Intake story:

Friday Funnies!

Off the Leash
Note: Click on the image to enlarge!



Thursday, November 30, 2017

Col. Potter Training Tips: Teaching "Look at Me!" is Easy, Essential, and Forever!

Written by a CP Volunteer

Teaching "Look at me!" is easy, essential, and Forever!

So you find yourself trying over and over again to get your stubborn Cairn to listen to whatever command or instruction you're attempting to give him or her.  And your voice gets louder and louder each time you repeat, with increasing urgency, your futile attempts to get him to respond.  Does this sound familiar?

"Buffy... Sit! ...Sit!  Buffy.. SIT! ...SIT ..SIT ...SIT SIT SIT SIT SIT SIT SIT SIT!!!!!!!!!"  And there he stands, oblivious to your demands.  What's wrong with him anyhow?  Is he deaf?

No, let me assure you his hearing is great.  In fact, Cairns' hearing is incredibily acute.  He hears you alright.  But he isn't listening to you at all!  Why?  Because there's nothing in it for him to do so, and because, well, because he's a Cairn Terrier, with all the stubborn, independent, mischievous attitude that implies.

So what can you do?  How do you get them to listen to you so that you can get them to do what you want, and sometimes absolutely need them to do?  I've found a very effective technique, that is very simple to teach.  It's the "Look At Me!" command.

OK, we're looking!  What's next?

You see, before you can get most Cairns to do what you want them to do, you have to get their undivided attention.  Not an easy task, as we all know how easily distracted they are and how focused they can become on heaven knows what...but certainly not on us.  The "Look At Me!" command is what I like to call an "interim command," in that its purpose is to redirect their attention from whatever they are focusing on in preparation for whatever follow-up command you want to issue to them.  It can also serve as a very powerful "luring" technique (more about that later).  What the "Look At Me!" command does is gets Buffy to, as its name states, LOOK at you.  That's half the battle with a Cairn Terrier.  And it's one you can win easily, I assure you.

Here's how to teach this simple, and very effective, command:

  • Gather some "high value" treats (small bits of cheese, freeze dried liver, etc., something the dog LOVES that you reserve for training).  Have them readily available in your pocket or the palm of your hand. Pick a quiet time, where there are no distractions and get Buffy to SIT.

  • Once he's sitting, place the treat between your thumb and index finger, so a portion of it is showing, but the majority of it is firmly grasped between your fingers.

  • Stand up reasonably straight, with just a slight bend at the waist (do NOT bend down at the knees, you don't want to be on his level)

  • Place your fingers (with the treat, of course!) just beyond the tip of his nose and draw it STRAIGHT up to the tip of your nose from his.  As you do so, say, in a firm and deep voice, "Buffy LOOK at ME!"  (emphasis on the LOOK and ME).  [A small aside here, females make the mistake of issuing commands to dogs in a high sing-song voice rather than a DEEP authoritative one.  Become accustomed to giving commands in a LOW, deep voice...imagine your voice if you were a male.  It's far more effective than our higher pitched voices.  Also, if you reserve that voice register for commands, it sounds different to the Cairn and will arouse his curiousity if nothing else!]

  • Because you've drawn the treat (which Buffy wants desperately) directly from his nose to yours, by necessity, his eyes will follow the treat toward your face.  That's what you want to happen.  As soon as your fingers with the treat touch your nose, and assuming his gaze has followed your fingers, tell him "GOOD BOY!" and give him the treat!

  • Do this 3 times in succession, 3 times per day to begin.  A total of 9 repetitions.  Most Cairns will be so eager for the treat that they will begin anticipating the command by looking at your NOSE as soon as you begin to draw the treat from his nose to yours.  THAT'S GREAT!  But remember to say (in your low, deep voice), "Buffy, LOOK at ME!" as you're drawing the treat toward your nose.  When he focuses on it, hold it there at the tip of your nose for a few seconds.  Tell him "GOOD BOY!" and give him the treat.  Your goal is to get him to anticipate the command by following it immediately AND to lengthen the time he focuses on your nose before you treat him.  Ideally, you can hold the treat at the tip of your nose for at least 3 seconds (count, 1-1000, 2-1000, 3-1000) and he'll focus on your face.  He's looking at you!

Now that he looks at you almost immediately AND he watches you intently for 3 seconds, it's time to begin treating him randomly rather than every single time.  Give him the treat 2 out of 3 times (or 4 out of 5), and gradually reduce the number of times you treat him until you no longer have to SHOW him the treat at all to get him to "LOOK at ME!"  This will take a week or so of work, but believe me, it's worth every single 90 second interval that you do it.   Always POINT at your nose, however, even if you don't have the treat.  It will become sign language to him.

"Look at Me!" is a great portable tool you can take anywhere!

When the command is firmly established in his or her repertoire, you should be able to get him to sit and LOOK at YOU simply by pointing at your nose (if he's already looking in your direction).  And if he isn't, by simply saying the command (in your best low register voice!).

Now, here's how you use this command after it's entrenched.  LOOK at ME! is what I refer to as an "interim" command.  In other words, it should be used as a bridge between a dog's not paying any attention to you whatsoever and the command (or direction or behavior) that you WANT him to perform.  It can be used to calm an overly excited dog.  And, as I indicated earlier, it's a GREAT way to "lure" a Cairn.

What do I mean by "lure" him?  Well, here's a true story.  My Cairn, Max, began exhibiting strong signs of wanting to chase cars at a very early age.  He'd tug and lunge on his leash whenever a car would approach us on our daily walks through the neighborhood.  I tried all the "tried and true" training techniques for breaking a dog's car chasing tendencies.  His obedience trainer instructed me to use the "leash correction" on him.  I did.  It not only didn't stop him, it made it worse.  I tried the alpha roll.  Another dead end.  I tried verbal corrections, again to no avail.  I had friends drive by and pitch coin-filled soda cans out the window as they passed Max and me.  They thought I was crazy, the neighbors were sure of it, and Max was more determined to lunge at the passing cars than ever.  His behavior was escalating rather than diminishing.  Frankly, I was desperate.  So, in the true spirit of desperation, I changed courses entirely.  I decided to change from negative training, which all the other techniques were, to a positive approach.  In other words, I decided, out of sheer desperation, to REWARD good behavior rather than trying to correct/change unwanted behavior.

Keep it positive!  Reward good behavior - Positive training works!

I resorted to the LOOK at ME! command I'd taught him as a very young puppy.  I loaded up with high-value treats and we set out for our walk.  Since we live in a suburban neighborhood with many winding streets, you can hear cars coming before you can see them.  As soon as I'd hear a car approaching, I'd give Max the LOOK at ME! command and I'd move the treat from the tip of my nose to approximately 1/2 way between his nose and mine.  As the car came closer, I'd repeat, "Max, LOOK at ME!" with the treat closer to his nose.  As soon as the car passed, I'd exclaim "GOOD BOY!!!! and would give him the treat immediately.  The trick, I soon learned, was to gain his attention with the "LOOK at ME!" command, hold his attention by showing (luring him with) the treat, then REWARDING him immediately through praise and the treat when he did NOT lunge at the car.  Rather than having him continue to SIT while I was "luring" him with the command and the visible treat, I began really luring him with it as I kept walking while keeping the treat out in front of him.  I kept PRAISING him as he continued to focus on the "lure" of the treat rather than lunging at the car.  And, as before, I'd give him the treat as soon as the car passed us.

To my amazement, it took only about 4 or 5 cars worth of high-value treat luring before I saw how a Cairn mind works!  I heard a car approaching and I immediately gave the "LOOK at ME!" command, with the treat at the ready.  I saw Max quickly look toward the car and then back at the treat... and I could see he'd made his decision.  The treat was worth more to him than was the car.  We were over the hump!  Within 2 or 3 days, Max would immediately LOOK at ME! as soon as he heard a car in the distance.  I began gradually (and randomly) reducing the times I gave him a treat, until, in a few more days, he didn't get treats at all and he was no longer interested in trying to chase cars.  

I have since used the same technique to redirect his desire to lunge at and chase bicyclists and motorcycles.  I also use it to distract him from other dogs while we're out on walks.

Even a rambunctious little boy can learn "Look at me!"

I have taught this command to every one of the 10 Fosters I've had, and they've all learned it quickly and effortlessly.  It's truly a wonderful training technique for your Cairn and can be used for so many things.  I use it all the time when I want to teach him a new behavior, or when I simply want to gain his attention.  Every now and then, when I issue the LOOK at ME! command, I'll surprise him with a treat, just to keep the command interesting to him.

Try it with your Cairn - and Good Luck!

Michele
CRM
2/5/05